Outreach

2015 summer outreach programs

2015 summer outreach programs

With schools on summer break, Tokyo Tech will be holding a variety of events for elementary, middle school, and high school students in August. These include the annual Open Campus and many hands-on science classes run by faculty members. Come and experience Tokyo Tech in summer 2015!

Please note that advance registration for some programs may already have closed. Events are primarily in Japanese and simultaneous interpretation is not available.

View all August 2015 events in Japanese here and events in English here.

August 5
Time machine-less travel to the past: Visualization of classical and modern Japanese

Associate Professor Hilofumi Yamamoto
Associate Professor Hilofumi Yamamoto

Language changes with time. The meaning of a word today is often not what it was in the past. Time machines and audio recordings of classical Japanese do not exist, but it is possible to decipher how words were used in sentences long ago. Associate Professor Hilofumi Yamamoto takes middle school students to the world of classical Japanese language using visualization methods.

August 5
Rakugo performance in English by Mr. Shinoharu Tatekawa

Rakugo storyteller Shinoharu Tatekawa is coming back to Tokyo Tech for his forth performance in English. Shinoharu is the third disciple of Shinosuke Tatekawa, one of the most famous rakugo artists in Japan. A graduate of Yale University, Shinoharu first worked at a trading company before choosing a very different path as a rakugo performer. Every year he enthralls audiences at the Institute with his fascinating storytelling. Shinoharu will be available for a Q&A session after his performance.

  • Rakugo performance in English by Mr. Shinoharu Tatekawa01
  • Rakugo performance in English by Mr. Shinoharu Tatekawa02

August 7
The art of DNA origami

DNA, the blueprint of life contained in cells, can now be used to fabricate nanoscale robots, in a process called DNA origami. High school students will be given a hands-on learning experience by Professor Akihiko Konagaya on DNA origami design methods, DNA hybridization, and observation methods using the atomic force microscope.

The art of DNA origami

  • Viewing a smiley created by DNA origami through an atomic force microscope

    Viewing a smiley created by DNA origami through an atomic force microscope

  • Setting a probe (sharp tip) used in an atomic force microscope

    Setting a probe (sharp tip) used in an atomic force microscope

August 7 and 8
Computer vision, human vision, your vision

Creating machines which recognize the external environment and are both safe and user-friendly requires knowledge of computer vision and brain science (human vision). Using 3D scenography of a huge aurora, this science class illustrates to high school students the principle of height measurement on the basis of stereoscopic vision, and shows the mechanism of how human beings recognize the external environment by moving their heads. Associate Professor Takako Yoshida will explain the significance of vision labs in an engineering school.

Computer vision, human vision, your vision 2014
Computer vision, human vision, your vision 2014

August 8
Open Campus

Open Campus is an opportunity for prospective students to visit Tokyo Tech's Ookayama Campus and feel its atmosphere firsthand. At open classes, lectures, and labs, Tokyo Tech faculty members and current students explain the appeal of the Institute.

Tokyo Tech is formulating a new education system to be launched in April 2016. Briefing sessions on Open Campus day will provide information about the new Schools and what kinds of study opportunities they can offer.

Open Campus

August 28
Play with the Earth 2015 — Examine the mystery of minerals and learn about our planet

Play with the Earth is a laboratory class held every year and designed for children in the upper elementary grades. This year, Institute Professor Shigenori Maruyama provides children with an opportunity to touch the history and mystery of the Earth by guiding them through three hands-on learning experiences:

1.
Observing minerals chiseled into gem shapes
2.
Hunting for Bolivian fossils hidden in gravel
3.
Experimenting with and classifying minerals by specific gravities using a heavy liquid
  • Crushing minerals for observation

    Crushing minerals for observation

  • Looking for fossils

    Looking for fossils

  • Experiment with minerals of various gravities

    Experiment with minerals of various gravities

  • Floating stone?

    Floating stone?

View all August 2015 events in Japanese here and events in English here.