About Tokyo Tech

School of Engineering

School of Engineering Creating New Industries and Advancing Civilization

The School of Engineering comprises the Departments of Mechanical Engineering, Systems and Control Engineering, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Information and Communications Engineering, and Industrial Engineering and Economics. At both undergraduate and graduate levels, students learn engineering technologies that make people's lives richer and more pleasant, and engage in research activities that advance these technologies.

We believe that this will lead to the development of various advanced technologies in areas such as renewable energy and energy conserving technology that prevent global warming, and practical nursing-care and assistive robots that support aging societies and complement human capabilities.

Machine and human control based on the dynamics between brain functions and the body, and innovative interface devices and information networks that make use of the five senses are other such areas where advancement is anticipated. After all, engineering is a pillar that supports civilization by working towards a happier, healthier, safer society.

Why Study at the School of Engineering?

Study monozukuri — the building blocks of civilizations.

Study monozukuri — the building blocks of civilizations.

From assistive and IT devices that surround our daily lives to cutting-edge devices such as rockets used in space exploration and robots used in high-tech medicine, as well as the development of entire systems, production management, and corporate management, learn about the various aspects of monozukuri (manufacturing, the Japanese way) in a variety of fields, and how it builds civilizations.

Have fun. And become creative thinkers.

Have fun. And become creative thinkers.

Various training is provided for students to become creative thinkers while having fun. Each department runs Creativity Development Courses that challenge students to be creative. It encourages them to come up with bold ideas and put these ideas into practice. Reputable courses include the International Design Contest (a precursor to today's Robocon), Original Machine Design, and Elekiteru Contest.

Find a range of graduate majors that extend beyond disciplinary boundaries.

Find a range of graduate majors that extend beyond disciplinary boundaries.

Interdisciplinary majors — Energy Science and Engineering, Engineering Sciences and Design, Human Centered Science and Biomedical Engineering, and Nuclear Engineering — that combine and are developed from various disciplines have been created to enable students to pursue engineering in a wide range of fields. After graduating from the Undergraduate Program, students can choose to continue their studies in any of these interdisciplinary graduate majors.

Featured Education and Research Activities

Global Scientists and Engineers Course

Global Scientists and Engineers Course

This course, available to undergraduate students, teaches advanced skills that will help graduates of the Undergraduate Program to perform advanced education and research activities in a Graduate Program. It prepares students to develop the necessary skills during their time in a Graduate Program to become individuals who will exhibit leadership around the world, including in developing nations.

It comprises the Global Awareness Program, English and Communication Program, International Cooperation Practice Grounded in Science and Technology Program, and Overseas Study or International Internship Program.

The Asia-Oceania Top University League on Engineering (AOTULE)

The Asia-Oceania Top University League on Engineering (AOTULE)

The Asia-Oceania Top University League on Engineering (AOTULE) is a university league established for the purpose of promoting multilateral exchange between 12 leading engineering universities in Asia and Oceania. Its activities include international student conferences, workshops held at Tokyo Tech as well as various other regions in Asia and Oceania, and overseas placements to conduct research.

Summer Exchange Research Program (SERP)

Summer Exchange Research Program (SERP)

Support is provided for students to study abroad for two to three months at partner universities based on school-to-school agreements in engineering fields.Current partner universities include University of Wisconsin–Madison; University of California, Santa Barbara; University of Cambridge; Imperial College London; University of Oxford; University of Warwick; University of Southampton; Pierre and Marie Curie University (UPMC, University of Paris VI); RWTH Aachen University; and Technical University of Madrid (UPM).

Practical English for Scientists and Engineers

Practical English for Scientists and Engineers

To cultivate scientists and engineers who will lead the global society, the Practical English for Scientists and Engineers course, which aims to improve practical English communication skills, is offered to undergraduates. Advanced practical English for a variety of situations encountered by engineers and scientists, such as presentations, debates, listening, and technical writing, is taught in small classes to improve overall communication skills.

6-University Human Assets Promotion Program for Innovative Education and Research :6U-HAPPIER

6-University Human Assets Promotion Program for Innovative Education 
and Research :6U-HAPPIER

Our updated Human Assets Promotion and Academic Career Enhancement (ACE) programs for engineering commit all six member universities to a joint policy of efficient knowledge sharing and mutual support for joint awareness and growth among faculty members at all levels.

The Engineering Schools of

  • Hokkaido University
  • Tohoku University
  • Tokyo Institute of Technology
  • Nagoya University
  • Osaka University
  • Kyushu University

share the aims of developing teaching skills and promoting career goals of those faculty members who have the desire and potential to become leaders in research, education, and administration, whether by inter-university faculty exchange, various ACE events, or active management learning sessions.

Message from Students

Tomohiro Oka

Developing a Meal-Assisting Robot for New User Experiences

Tomohiro Oka

1st-year master's student, AY 2018

Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering

To help consumers eat Japanese cuisine more easily, we are developing a new meal-assisting robot equipped with a gripper on its stationary arm to replace the conventional spoon. I am primarily responsible for the robot's hardware, and find the experience of creating new concepts for robots from scratch alongside people of various backgrounds to be rewarding. I want to be an engineer that brings smiles to people's faces.

Shiika Kado

Non-Contact Heart Rate Estimation Using a Camera

Shiika Kado

1st-year master's student, AY 2018

Department of Systems and Control Engineering, School of Engineering

We are conducting research that involves measuring heart rates and other biological data of people without physical contact, using only digital video of their faces. The skin color of humans is subject to change because of the blood flowing beneath the skin. By capturing these subtle changes that are invisible to the naked eye, we can estimate the flow of blood. This theme has potential for various applications such as stress measurement, illness detection and emotion sensing and I find this to be a most fascinating theme.

Haruna Onishi

Solving Challenges of dc Electric Railways with Rechargeable Batteries

Haruna Onishi

2nd-year master's student, AY 2017

Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Engineering

The applications for dc electric railways with rechargeable batteries on-board have seen progress. Advantages like energy conservation, however, are countered by challenges that relate to the reduction in size of traditionally heavy and bulky inductors and removal of dc breakers. Such challenges have sparked my interest in the research of electric power converters in order to find solutions. The research looks at two facets: simulation analysis and mini-model experimentation. In the future, I look forward to contributing to society as an expert on electricity.

Hiroki Kuroda

Fully Mobilizing Mathematical Knowledge to Solve Signal Processing Problems

Hiroki Kuroda

3rd-year doctoral student, AY 2018

Department of Information and Communications Engineering, School of Engineering

I am studying signal processing issues arising commonly in data science as well as in information and communications engineering. Signal processing is an integrated science that employs mathematical knowledge to extract high-value information from various types of measured data. Deepening the knowledge that I gained in classes and conceiving ideas that no one else has come up with is certainly not an easy task. However, I believe that using mathematics, which is my life's passion, and conducting research that contributes to the broad field of engineering is greatly rewarding.

Yuko Kuroki

Considering Efficient Transport Networks with Domestic and International Researchers

Yuko Kuroki

2nd-year master's student, AY 2017

Department of Industrial Engineering and Economics, School of Engineering

My research examines efficient transport network designs, such as transport hubs and where to establish them in a large number of airports. The most attractive aspect of my research, which is highly fulfilling, is solving societal problems using mathematical approaches. I also have opportunities to discuss my research at domestic and international conferences as well as to interact with large numbers of researchers of diverse nationalities and backgrounds.

Anyang Xu

Taking a Mathematical Approach to Solving Problems in Society

Anyang Xu

2nd-year master's student, AY 2018

Department of Industrial Engineering and Economics, School of Engineering

My research is concerned with the study of making aircraft boarding time as short as possible. An optimal strategy is derived by organizing passengers into boarding groups according to their seat assignments. I formulated the aircraft boarding problem based on the assumption that boarding time is proportional to the number of times passengers pass one another. The formulation was made more practicable by taking into account passengers who travel in groups and board together (friends, families, etc.). I hope to contribute to society by working to resolve everyday frustrations and inconveniences that we face.

Number of Students and Faculty Members

Students - 3,175

Faculty - 254

* Student numbers denote maximum student capacity of the department.

* Number of faculty is subject to change.

Click below for the list of School of Engineering faculty.

List of Faculty

Teaching Certificates That Can Be Acquired

<Undergraduate Degree Program>

First-Class Teaching Certificate for Upper Secondary School(Computer, industry)

<Master's Degree Program>

Advanced Class Teaching Certificate for Upper Secondary School(Computer, industry)

Disclosure of Information

Publications

Videos

* Turn on the captions for the video

Message from the Dean

Nobuyuki IWATSUKI

Engineering contributes to civilization, a framework for the happiness of humankind, by creating new technologies that make people's lives richer and more comfortable. Tokyo Tech's School of Engineering consists of five departments: Mechanical Engineering, Systems and Control Engineering, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Information and Communications Engineering, and Industrial Engineering and Economics. Our students broadly learn scientific principles and industrial applications, and then experience the latest research works and international collaborations so as to play an active part in the world as creative experts. Faculty members deal with wide research fields and carry out various forms of collaborative research with industry. Cross-departmental research groups execute global and interdisciplinary research projects in order to contribute to the development of a more sustainable world. The School of Engineering strongly hopes to open up a bright future together with young students equipped with rich sensitivity and vitality. Nobuyuki IWATSUKI

  • Mitsuji SAMPEI, Associate Dean for Education and International Affairs
  • Kotaro INOUE, Associate Dean for Finance and Safety
  • Yasuyuki MIYAMOTO , Associate Dean for Planning and Public Relations
  • Shuichiro HIRAI, Associate Dean for Research and Evaluation