About Tokyo Tech

School of Environment and Society

School of Environment
and Society
Adapting Environments to Shifting Attitudes

The School of Environment and Society comprises the Departments of Architecture and Building Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Transdisciplinary Science and Engineering, Social and Human Sciences, Innovation Science, and Technology and Innovation Management. Although the specializations of the six departments differ,at the School of Environment and Society, we all aim to train individuals who are capable of solving interdisciplinary problems. This is important because today, significant changes in global and city environments as well as shifts in the social climate have generated transdisciplinary problems that transcend multiple fields. The need to cultivate students with broad perspectives and deep knowledge that are of international value goes without saying. Our students are trained to become future-oriented, global-minded individuals who can understand the latest in technology, values, and concepts that are sought by society. Furthermore, they will develop skills to evaluate and integrate technologies from a wide range of fields, skills to communicate with engineers in these various fields, skills to make concrete proposals, and management skills.

Why Study at the School of Environment and Society?

How do you perceive societies and environments?

How do you perceive societies and environments?

While studying engineering and the natural sciences, it is important to keep a philosophical eye on what is taking place within environments and societies. For this, discovering your own philosophies not only through your knowledge of various fields, but formation of these based on ample historical and technological context becomes crucial.

Acquire globally oriented logical reasoning and communication skills.

Acquire globally oriented logical reasoning and communication skills.

For researchers and engineers to effectively fulfill their roles in the international community, interaction and exchange of information with peers around the world are of great importance. Learn reasoning and communication methods that allow you to thoroughly understanding the views of others, make proposals that focus on selected issues, and logically and accurately convey your thoughts and intentions.

Experience education and research that are built around monozukuri and kotozukuri.

Experience education and research that are built around monozukuri and kotozukuri.

Through trial and error, creation and destruction, appreciate anew the importance of "kotozukuri" (value creation). Realize how it can be absorbed to solve the perennial problems afflicting Japanese society, such as concept creation issues and lowering the cost of "monozukuri" (manufacturing, the Japanese way). Learn to make concrete proposals built around this underlying philosophy.

At a Glance

School of Environment and Society
1st year of bachelor's program
Undergraduate Major
(undergraduate study year 2–4)
Graduate Major
School of Environment and Society*1
School-Affiliated Research Center

*1 1st-year undergraduates enrolled before April 2018 are affiliated with the 4th or 6th Academic Group, while those enrolled in or after April 2019 are affiliated with the School of Environment and Society.

*2 Interdisciplinary graduate majors connected to multiple departments

Featured Education and Research Activities

The Asia-Oceania Top University League on Engineering (AOTULE)

The Asia-Oceania Top University League on Engineering (AOTULE)

The Asia-Oceania Top University League on Engineering (AOTULE) is a university league established for the purpose of promoting multilateral exchange between 12 leading engineering universities in Asia and Oceania. Its activities include international student conferences, workshops held at Tokyo Tech as well as various other regions in Asia and Oceania, and overseas placements to conduct research.

Summer Exchange Research Program (SERP)

Summer Exchange Research Program (SERP)

Support is provided for students to study abroad for two to three months at partner universities based on school-to-school agreements in engineering fields.Current partner universities include University of Wisconsin–Madison; University of California, Santa Barbara; University of Cambridge; Imperial College London; University of Oxford; University of Warwick; University of Southampton; Pierre and Marie Curie University (UPMC, University of Paris VI); RWTH Aachen University; and Technical University of Madrid (UPM).

International Program on Earthquake Engineering

International Program on Earthquake Engineering

This International Graduate Program develops leading researchers and engineers who can display worldwide leadership in the field of earthquake hazard mitigation. In addition to cultivating individuals who possess advanced knowledge on earthquake hazard mitigation, these individuals will also be cultivated to possess international communication skills, a broad perspective, the ability to think flexibly, and the ability to generate novel and remarkable ideas. Furthermore, they will be trained to become individuals who show international leadership in education and research, and can manage undertakings, from the identification of problems to finding their solution, in the global community.

Postgraduate Program for Multinational Architects in Conjunction with Engineering and Urban Design

Postgraduate Program for Multinational Architects in Conjunction with Engineering and Urban Design

This International Graduate Program, which deals with architectural design, is a Master's Program targeted mainly at international students. Its curriculum is made up of courses that require students to make specific architectural design proposals (studio courses) based on fieldwork that searches for new architectural themes in an urban context, and those based on acquired knowledge of architectural history and design theories. In addition, architectural tours are offered as seminars, giving students the opportunity to see and understand Japanese metropolises and architectural environments throughout the country.

Joint Workshop between Tongji University and Tokyo Tech

Joint Workshop between Tongji University and Tokyo Tech

A joint workshop on architectural design and another on building structure materials are organized by Tongji University in China and Tokyo Tech once a year. Through collaborative activities in workshops that last from several days to a week, participants learn to work together as a team and with those from different cultures. The venue alternates yearly between Shanghai and Tokyo.

Message from Students

Yoko Kihara

Delving Deep into Problems with No Optimal Solutions

Yoko Kihara

3rd-year bachelor’s student, AY 2018

Department of Architecture and Building Engineering, School of Environment and Society

I love spending time pondering over good solutions. Just as I think I have resolved one issue, another puzzling one arises. It is exhilarating to finally find the key to a solution after much contemplation as well as seeking advice from senior students and faculty members. I have a lot of fun with model building as well, imagining how my design will be brought into existence and how the structure will be inhabited. I want to enjoy architecture to the full, and I intend to do so by acquiring knowledge that transcends disciplinary boundaries.

Hiromasa Mishima

Attempting Condition Assessment and Abnormality Detection of Bridges through Structure Monitoring

Hiromasa Mishima

1st-year master’s student, AY 2017

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Environment and Society

Many bridges currently in operation bear a great likelihood of impairment and deterioration as the years accumulate. Structure monitoring that combines data measurements from sensors with numerical simulation analyses is employed in an attempt to assess conditions and detect abnormalities. My research focuses on developing maintenance technologies, which are easy to envision, that can be applied to existing bridges. For these reasons, I feel that the research is quite meaningful.

Kyoka Inoue

Aiming to Support Japan's Infrastructure by Becoming a Concrete Expert

Kyoka Inoue

3rd-year bachelor’s student, AY 2018

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Environment and Society

I was able to look at my major with renewed interest when I found out that the study of infrastructure encompassed a broad range of topics including communications and ecosystems. I especially love laboratory courses as they enable me to deepen my understanding through observing the difference between theory and practice. When I advance to my fourth year, I would like to join a laboratory of my choosing after having acquired enough knowledge in a wide range of fields. I want to do research on concrete, so that I can contribute to building a robust infrastructure that would withstand Japan's natural disasters.

Tsamara Tsani

Studying Japan's Waste Treatment Technology to Improve Living Standards of Developing Countries

Tsamara Tsani

3rd-year bachelor’s student, AY 2018

Department of Transdisciplinary Science and Engineering, School of Environment and Society

Every week in the Introduction to International Development course, we get to meet experts from various organizations who are involved in the development of countries around the world. Not only do we get to hear about their activities, but we also get to do group work on case studies ourselves, presenting our solutions and receiving feedback from the experts. I myself am interested in the problem of waste treatment in developing countries, where people suffer greatly from the lack of technology and systems for managing waste. I plan to carry out research into waste treatment technology and the effective utilization of waste.

Ayaka Hayashi

First-Year Undergraduate Studies for Women in Engineering

Ayaka Hayashi

1st-year doctoral student, AY 2018

Department of Social and Human Sciences, School of Environment and Society

I believe that the first year of undergraduate studies is a crucial period to build the foundation for learning at a university. I am conducting research on first-year engineering studies for women, with a focus on Purdue University College of Engineering's First-Year Engineering. In my research, I use interviews to discover the kinds of experiences women have and the things they learn during their time in this First-Year Engineering Program.

Shuto Miyashita

Promoting Innovation with Ambidextrous Knowledge either Science, Technology, and Managerial Knowledge

Shuto Miyashita

1st-year doctoral student, AY 2018

Department of Innovation Science, School of Environment and Society

I am conducting research for methodology on organizational operations and implementation into the actual society to promote interdisciplinary research and university-industry collaborations. Results of scientific and technological researches from academia have the potential to resolve social issues we face. However, implementing these research results into the actual society, it is necessary to understand the knowledge not only science and technology, but also management of them. I aim to find methods to turn these research results into innovations to realize better world.

Shogo Yanakawa

Connecting Technology to Management in Order to Generate Innovation

Shogo Yanakawa

2nd-year professional master’s degree student, AY 2018

Technology and Innovation Management (professional master's degree program), School of Environment and Society

I am conducting research on user innovation for enterprises to help users bring forth innovative solutions. User innovation faces issues in regards to continuous development and management of intellectual property. I analyze cases involving problems that have occurred, conduct surveys, and research means of solving such issues from both qualitative and quantitative perspectives. My research is very enjoyable as I am able to apply my knowledge of both technology and management.

Syunnosuke Yamada

Bringing Innovation to My Beloved Ramen

Syunnosuke Yamada

1st-year professional master’s degree student, AY 2018

Technology and Innovation Management (professional master's degree program), School of Environment and Society

Ramen is loved not only in Japan but also all over the world, and personally, I cannot get enough of it. My ramen-related research makes every day an extremely fun experience.

Still in the middle of my research, I am currently examining the differences between Japan's signature ramen and purely Japanese cuisine, such as udon and soba, in terms of composition and other respects. Taking advantage of advice from teachers and people of various backgrounds, I will have gained greater perspective from which my research on ramen will surely benefit.

Number of Students and Faculty Members

Students - 1,630

Faculty - 184

* Student numbers denote maximum student capacity of the department.

* Number of Faculty is subject to change.

Click below for the list of School of Environment and Society Faculty.

List of Faculty

Teaching Certificates That Can Be Acquired

<Undergraduate Degree Program>

First-Class Teaching Certificate for Upper Secondary School(Industry)

<Master's Degree Program>

Advanced Class Teaching Certificate for Upper Secondary School(Industry)

Disclosure of Information

Message from the Dean

Norihiro NAKAI

The School of Environment and Society pursues academic and technological excellence not only in the construction of individual buildings, but also in the creation of sustainable environments on regional, national, and global scales. Contemporary issues relating to our environment, be it preparedness for large-scale natural disasters, the preservation of biodiversity, or a balance between the global economy and local historical and cultural traditions, cannot be achieved through expertise in one single discipline. Collaborative action across traditional borders is crucial.
The School's five departments ― Architecture and Building Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Transdisciplinary Science and Engineering, Social and Human Science, Innovation Science ― and the professional master's degree program in Technology and Innovation Management utilize hard and soft technologies, technical ingenuity and creative action, and a wide range of interdisciplinary academic fields to address a variety of problems confronting the world. We hope to contribute to the sustainable development of humankind and society, together with young students full of vigor and vision. Norihiro NAKAI

  • Toru TAKEUCHI, Associate Dean for Education and International Affairs
  • Hirofumi HINODE, Associate Dean for Finance and Safety
  • Yasuo ASAKURA, Associate Dean for Planning and Public Relations
  • Shuzo FUJIMURA, Associate Dean for Research and Evaluation