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Tokyo Tech Bulletin No. 51 out now

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November 5, 2018

Tokyo Tech Bulletin is an email newsletter introducing Tokyo Tech's research, education, and students' activities. The latest edition, "Tokyo Tech Bulletin No. 51," has been published.

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SPECIAL TOPICS

Quantum science and technology

Quantum science and technology
Unlocking the quantum world to surpass the limits of the present

Over the past few years, a new research field has arisen at Tokyo Tech called "quantum science and technology." But what exactly is quantum science and technology and why are we talking about it? We interviewed the Dean of the School of Engineering, Nobuyuki Iwatsuki, who plays a central role in promoting the advancement of this exciting field.

Dormitory life at Tokyo Tech

Dormitory life at Tokyo Tech
Residents share experiences and advice for prospective students

Student dormitory residents and the Institute's Student Support Division provide an inside look at dorm life and offer advice for prospective residents, including what to expect and how to apply.

I want to do things differently from other people and live creatively -- Alexis André

I want to do things differently from other people and live creatively -- Alexis André

I want to do things differently from other people and live creatively -- Alexis André Fifteen years ago, a young man from France left his hometown and came to Tokyo Tech. At our school, he overcame difficulties and obtained his doctoral degree through the Tokyo Tech graduate program. Today, he has started to provide the world with a series of results from unique research that is a blend of art and computer science.

Research

Piecing Together the Narrative of Evolution

Piecing Together the Narrative of Evolutionouter

EON postdoctoral fellow Jennifer Hoyal Cuthill's work looking at fossil records of the Ediacaran to shed light on the evolution of early life in the early Earth's environment.

The role of the Atg2 protein in tethering pre-autophagosomal membranes to the endoplasmic reticulum

The role of the Atg2 protein in tethering pre-autophagosomal membranes to the endoplasmic reticulum

Postdoctoral Researcher Tetsuya Kotani, Associate Professor Hitoshi Nakatogawa, Honorary Professor Yoshinori Ohsumi and colleagues at Tokyo Tech have analyzed the Atg protein1 Atg2, whose function had been completely unknown, and have discovered that Atg2 tethers the pre-autophagosomal membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum during autophagosome formation.

No Assembly Required: Self-assembling Silicone-based Polymers

No Assembly Required: Self-assembling Silicone-based Polymers

Scientists at Tokyo Tech, RIKEN and Tohoku University have developed a silicone polymer chain that can self-assemble into a 3D periodic structure. They achieved this by using their recently reported self-assembling triptycene molecules to modify the ends of the polymer chains.

A pheromone-sensing gene that predates land-dwelling vertebrates

A pheromone-sensing gene that predates land-dwelling vertebrates

Scientists at Tokyo Tech have discovered a gene that appears to play a vital role in pheromone sensing. The gene is conserved across fish and mammals and over 400 million years of vertebrate evolution, indicating that the pheromone sensing system is much more ancient than previously believed. This discovery opens new avenues of research into the origin, evolution, and function of pheromone signaling.

Breakthrough in blending metals: Precise control of multimetallic one-nanometer cluster formation achieved

Breakthrough in blending metals: Precise control of multimetallic one-nanometer cluster formation achieved

Researchers in Japan have found a way to create innovative materials by blending metals with precision control. Their approach, based on a concept called atom hybridization, opens up an unexplored area of chemistry that could lead to the development of advanced functional materials.

Lighting it up: A new non-toxic, cheap, and stable blue photoluminescent material

Lighting it up: A new non-toxic, cheap, and stable blue photoluminescent material

Scientists at Tokyo Tech have designed a novel photoluminescent material that is cheap to fabricate, does not use toxic starting materials, and is very stable, enhancing our understanding of the quantic nature of photoluminescence.

In the spotlight

Contact

Public Relations Section

Email publication@jim.titech.ac.jp

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