Research

Tokyo Tech News

Tokyo Tech Bulletin No. 60 out now

RSS

Published: December 25, 2020

Tokyo Tech Bulletin is an email newsletter introducing Tokyo Tech's research, education, and students' activities. The latest edition, "Tokyo Tech Bulletin No. 60," has been published.

To get the most recent news from the Institute directly to your inbox, subscribe to Tokyo Tech Bulletin outer now.

SPECIAL TOPICS

Living in a world with COVID-19: Future technology for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment

Living in a world with COVID-19: Future technology for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment

As a technical university, Tokyo Tech promotes collaboration between medicine and engineering, and it has conducted many studies on medical and public health applications from an engineering standpoint.

Kei Sakaguchi - Development and standardization of 5G - Keys to putting automated-driving cars on the road

Kei Sakaguchi - Development and standardization of 5G - Keys to putting automated-driving cars on the road

In 2020, full-scale commercial service is launching for the new wireless communication standard known as 5G. Kei Sakaguchi, a professor in School of Engineering proposed technology that forms the basis of 5G and worked on its international standardization. Currently, he is working to create a 5G-driven "Super Smart Society".

Research

Designing DNA From Scratch: Engineering the Functions of Micrometer-Sized DNA Droplets

Designing DNA From Scratch: Engineering the Functions of Micrometer-Sized DNA Droplets

The droplets exhibit dynamic functions such as fusion, fission, Janus-shape formation, and protein capture. Their technique is expected to be applicable to a wide variety of biomaterials, opening doors to many promising applications in materials design, drug delivery, and even artificial cell-like molecular systems.

New research shows how complex chemistry may be relevant to origins of life on Earth

New research shows how complex chemistry may be relevant to origins of life on Earth

New research suggests that mixtures of simple organic compounds in water exposed to high energy radiation react to form a variety of more complex organic compounds that could help make RNA.

Small Enzyme-Mimicking Polymers May Have Helped Start Life

Small Enzyme-Mimicking Polymers May Have Helped Start Life

ELSI scientists find that small highly branched polymers which may have formed spontaneously on early Earth can mimic modern biological protein enzyme function. These simple catalytic structures may have helped jump start the origins of life.

Running on Empty: New Affordable Catalyst Relies on Nitrogen Vacancies to Produce Ammonia

Running on Empty: New Affordable Catalyst Relies on Nitrogen Vacancies to Produce Ammonia

By exploring a new design concept based around nitrogen vacancies, they created an inexpensive catalyst from abundantly available elements that still achieves state-of-the-art performance.

In the spotlight

Contact

Public Relations Group

Email publication@jim.titech.ac.jp

RSS