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Tokyo Tech Bulletin No. 47 out now

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May 25, 2018

Tokyo Tech Bulletin is an email newsletter introducing Tokyo Tech's research, education, and students' activities. The latest edition, "Tokyo Tech Bulletin No. 47," has been published.

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SPECIAL TOPICS

Nobuyuki Kawai - Exploring the origins of the Universe and elements with gamma-ray bursts

Nobuyuki Kawai - Exploring the origins of the Universe and elements with gamma-ray bursts

Research

Keeping an eye on the health of structures

Keeping an eye on the health of structures

Scientists at Tokyo Tech used synthetic-aperture radar data from four different satellites, combined with statistical methods, to determine the structural deformation patterns of the largest bridge in Iran.

The physics of finance helps solve a century-old mystery

The physics of finance helps solve a century-old mystery

By unleashing the power of big data and statistical physics, researchers in Japan have developed a model that aids understanding of how and why financial Brownian motion arises.

Tokyo Tech's six-legged robots get closer to nature

Tokyo Tech's six-legged robots get closer to nature

A study led by Tokyo Tech researchers has uncovered new ways of driving multi-legged robots by means of a two-level controller. The proposed controller uses a network of so-called non-linear oscillators that enables the generation of diverse gaits and postures, which are specified by only a few high-level parameters. The study inspires new research into how multi-legged robots can be controlled, including in the future using brain-computer interfaces.

Researchers at Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) of Tokyo Tech uncover new mechanism for evolution that helps explain the origin of new functions

Researchers at Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) of Tokyo Tech uncover new mechanism for evolution that helps explain the origin of new functionsouter

An often-wondered question about evolution is 'Where do new forms and functions come from?' Understanding the source of novelty in evolution is key to understanding how life got from its simplest precursors to the complex panoply of biodiversity we observe in the world today.

In the spotlight

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