Education

2nd Academic Group

Cutting-edge materials technology

2nd Academic Group

Creating, examining, and evaluating materials

The 2nd academic group provides a multifaceted approach to the study of various materials, including metals, plastics, ceramics, and others less commonplace in everyday life.

Second-year students explore material properties, the mechanisms through which they emerge, and the basics of synthesis methods in required courses such as quantum mechanics and thermodynamics. Third-year students systematically deepen their knowledge in the areas of physics and chemistry associated with metallic, organic, and inorganic materials, fortifying their understanding of the fundamentals and honing their laboratory skills through experiments. Fourth-year students take on the Independent Research Project during which they create, examine, and evaluate materials through hands-on learning.

Most students in this academic group go on to pursue master's degrees. By leveraging their practical experience and ability to create, many graduates find careers in, among others, the materials, electronics, and automotive industries.

Features of 2nd Academic Group

Feature 1: Freshman seminar

Freshman seminar teamwork
Freshman seminar teamwork

Soon after enrollment, new students attend a two-day overnight seminar as part of their orientation. With a history exceeding 30 years, the seminar is affectionately called the bus seminar because students travel to their destination by bus, getting to know each other on the way. During the seminar, students work in teams and disassemble anything they can get their hands on — calculators, motors, toy cars — and then hold discussions and make presentations about the materials and mechanisms they encounter. Lectures by alumni, social gatherings at night, and other fun events are also included. Many students find lifelong friends at the seminar.

Feature 2: Technical innovation

Pipe frame car race
Pipe frame car race

This academic group attaches a high value to technical innovation — students conduct experiments on a routine basis and yield results through hands-on experiences. The latter half of the degree program builds on these experiences with courses involving more unique, specialized experiments. In the Creativity Laboratory in Metallurgy course, students design and build pipe frame cars, fuel cells, and music boxes, relishing the experience of creating things. The Metallurgical Engineering Laboratory course consists of three parts to further expand students' creativity: performing fundamental experiments using textbook methods, identifying and solving problems based on findings from these experiments, and making presentations regarding the outcomes.