About Tokyo Tech

School of Materials and Chemical Technology

School of Materials
and Chemical Technology
Encompassing the Disciplines of Science
and Engineering

Tokyo Tech boasts top-level research teams in the fields of chemical and materials science and engineering, with some excellent achievements to their name. In the School of Materials and Chemical Technology, students learn how to improve our lives and solve environmental, resource, and energy issues by creating new substances and materials of direct use to society, and creating new methods for their production. The School consists of two departments — Chemical Science and Engineering, with its roots in molecular chemistry, and Materials Science and Engineering, with its roots in solid materials. Students will learn a broad range of basic theories related to matter and materials, and how these theories can be applied to better support our lives. We also have affiliated research centers designated as national research hubs for research in chemistry and materials, where students come into contact with and engage in cutting-edge research as they advance through their studies.

Why Study at the School of Materials and Chemical Technology?

Experience the joy of discovering new materials and possibilities.

Experience the joy of discovering new materials and possibilities.

University research aims for breakthroughs that lead to the discovery of never-before-seen materials and substances. When you discover a novel substance, you come to appreciate this research and its impact on society.

Finding a field that matches your interests is easy, and your future options open up.

Finding a field that matches your interests is easy, and your future options open up.

There is great diversity in substance and materials research, with everything from science to engineering topics. That is why substance and materials professionals are needed in all sorts of sectors, such as cars, machines, electrical devices, textiles, medicine, and energy.

This field is connected to key industries, so you do not need to worry about not finding a job.

This field is connected to key industries, so you do not need to worry about not finding a job.

In addition to plentiful options, this field is connected to areas crucial to Japanese industry, where many of our graduates are enjoying great success. It is fair to say that if you study hard, you will not have a problem finding a job — another benefit to studying at the School.

At a Glance

School of Materials and Chemical Technology
1st year of bachelor's program
Undergraduate Major
(undergraduate study year 2–4)
Graduate Major
School of Materials and Chemical Technology*1

*1 1st-year undergraduates enrolled before April 2018 are affiliated with the 2nd or 3rd Academic Group, while those enrolled in or after April 2019 are affiliated with the School of Materials and Chemical Technology.

*2 Interdisciplinary graduate majors connected to multiple departments

Featured Education and Research Activities

The Asia-Oceania Top University League on Engineering (AOTULE)

The Asia-Oceania Top University League on Engineering (AOTULE)

The Asia-Oceania Top University League on Engineering (AOTULE) is a university league established for the purpose of promoting multilateral exchange between 12 leading engineering universities in Asia and Oceania. Its activities include international student conferences, workshops held at Tokyo Tech as well as various other regions in Asia and Oceania, and overseas placements to conduct research.

Summer Exchange Research Program (SERP)

Summer Exchange Research Program (SERP)

Support is provided for students to study abroad for two to three months at partner universities based on school-to-school agreements in engineering fields.Current partner universities include University of Wisconsin–Madison; University of California, Santa Barbara; University of Cambridge; Imperial College London; University of Oxford; University of Warwick; University of Southampton; Pierre and Marie Curie University (UPMC, University of Paris VI); RWTH Aachen University; and Technical University of Madrid (UPM).

Number of Students and Faculty Members

Students - 1,989

Faculty - 190

* Student numbers denote maximum student capacity of the department.

* Number of faculty is subject to change.

Click below for the list of School of Materials and Chemical Technology faculty.

List of Faculty

Teaching Certificates That Can Be Acquired

<Undergraduate Degree Program>

First-Class Teaching Certificate for Lower Secondary School(Science)

First-Class Teaching Certificate for Upper Secondary School(Science, industry)

<Master's Degree Program>

Advanced Class Teaching Certificate for Lower Secondary School(Science)

Advanced Class Teaching Certificate for Upper Secondary School(Science, industry)

Disclosure of Information

Publications

Message from the Dean

Yuji WADA

Materials can be considered on a molecular level or a slightly broader stratum that includes space and the cosmos. By the turn of the 20th century, humankind had entered an era of science and technology where many materials were chemically engineered, bringing us convenience and quality of life. This world has, however, always existed in parallel with the natural, non-manipulated world. In the material civilization of the future, chemically engineered creations will no longer be perceived as such, and ideally, will co-exist without interfering with the untouched world.
The School of Materials and Chemical Technology formulates principles and creates technologies that support the material civilization of the next generation. This includes the creation of methodologies that allow efficient organization and management data. To realize such a successful society, we must look ahead to ensure we are well prepared to walk into the future together. Yuji WADA

  • Ichiro YAMANAKA, Associate Dean for Education and International Affairs
  • Masahiro SUSA, Associate Dean for Finance and Safety
  • Ikuyoshi TOMITA, Associate Dean for Planning and Public Relations
  • Akira NAKAJIMA, Associate Dean for Research and Evaluation