About Tokyo Tech

School of Materials and Chemical Technology

School of Materials
                and Chemical Creating Future Society with the Power of Materials and Chemistry

Tokyo Tech boasts a world-class research team in the fields of materials and applied chemistry, and has achieved outstanding results to date. The School of Materials and Chemical Technology contributes to creating future society through developing novel materials useful in solving society's problems related to the environment, resources, energy, and health and medicine, as well as improving the quality of our lives. In particular, we aim to realize a carbon-neutral society, which is important for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The School is composed of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, which focuses on studying solid materials, and the Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, which focuses on molecules and chemistry, and covers a wide range of subjects from atoms and electrons to devices and plants. We also promote innovative material development integrated with information science. Through such cutting-edge research, we foster global researchers and engineers who can lead the development of materials in the future.

NEWS

Why Study at the School of Materials and Chemical Technology?

Experience the joy of discovering new materials and possibilities.

Experience the joy of discovering new materials and possibilities.

University research aims for breakthroughs that lead to the discovery of never-before-seen materials and substances. When you discover a novel substance, you come to appreciate this research and its impact on society.

Finding a field that matches your interests is easy, and your future options open up.

Finding a field that matches your interests is easy, and your future options open up.

There is great diversity in substance and materials research, with everything from science to engineering topics. That is why substance and materials professionals are needed in all sorts of sectors, such as cars, machines, electrical devices, textiles, medicine, and energy.

This field is connected to key industries, so you do not need to worry about not finding a job.

This field is connected to key industries, so you do not need to worry about not finding a job.

In addition to plentiful options, this field is connected to areas crucial to Japanese industry, where many of our graduates are enjoying great success. It is fair to say that if you study hard, you will not have a problem finding a job — another benefit to studying at the School.

At a Glance

* Interdisciplinary graduate majors connected to multiple departments

Featured Education and Research Activities

International Cooperation

International Cooperation

As university education is rapidly globalizing, the School of Engineering, the School of Materials and Chemical Technology, and the School of Environment and Society are focusing on creating international research networks to support participation in projects and encourage exchange among students, faculty, and researchers. More than 50 school-level agreements have been concluded with top-level universities around the world, and international exchange programs with scholarships from Engineering School Funds are being implemented with some of those universities. In addition, Erasmus+ will provide financial assistance to students wishing to study at relevant partner universities with which international exchange agreements are in place.

The Asia-Oceania Top University League on Engineering (AOTULE)

The Asia-Oceania Top University League on Engineering (AOTULE)

The Asia-Oceania Top University League on Engineering (AOTULE) is a university league established for the purpose of promoting multilateral exchange between 12 leading engineering universities in Asia and Oceania. Its activities include international student conferences, workshops held at Tokyo Tech as well as various other regions in Asia and Oceania, and overseas placements to conduct research.

Summer Exchange Research Program (SERP)

Summer Exchange Research Program (SERP)

Support is provided for students to study abroad for two to three months at partner universities based on school-to-school agreements in engineering fields.Current partner universities include University of Wisconsin–Madison; University of California, Santa Barbara; University of Cambridge; University of Oxford; University of Warwick; University of Southampton; Pierre and Marie Curie University (UPMC, University of Paris VI); RWTH Aachen University; and Technical University of Madrid (UPM).

Message from Students

Rurika Kubota

A Fascinating Look into Materials Science at the Atomic Scale

Rurika Kubota

3rd-year bachelor's student, AY 2018
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Materials and Chemical Technology

My concept of solids was pretty obscure when I first started studying my discipline. However, by taking a look at solids at atomic and molecular levels, I have been able to grasp their nature and see the potential of materials development. Furthermore, learning about the theoretical derivations of material properties and how they have changed over time made me appreciate the long history of my discipline's scientific endeavor. When I graduate, I hope to get involved in developing new materials and improving manufacturing processes.

Yuka Morimoto

Tokyo Tech is Full of Attractive Options such as Studying Abroad and Leadership Training

Yuka Morimoto

1st-year master's student, AY 2017
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Materials and Chemical Technology

I really had a love for physics, and initially entered the First Academic Group of the School of Science, but then I felt that the School of Engineering was better for studying practical matters. Some more re-thinking led me to transfer to the Department of Inorganic Materials in the Second Academic Group, in which I was leaning toward physics as it also covers studies about the environment and energy. One advantage of Tokyo Tech was that it allowed me to decide after the first year whether the department I selected was a good fit, or whether I wanted to change to another in the second year. Once I entered the Department of Inorganic Materials, I delighted in learning about materials and mechanisms close at hand, like electronic materials, glass, and metals, as well as energy and the environment. In my research, I focus on the preparation of new substances to improve electrical characteristics by substituting oxygen with nitrogen in materials used for capacitors. I find many people at Tokyo Tech are genial, and the professors are passionate in their support. Another part of Tokyo Tech's appeal is the emphasis on pedagogy for capable, talented individuals around the world. Certain classes train people in leadership, and native English-speaking professors provide instruction in English. There are many opportunities to meet international students, with many places provided for social interaction.

*1
The abovementioned School of Science, School of Engineering, and Department of Inorganic Materials are student affiliations for those who entered in 2015 or earlier. For details on the education system in 2016 and onward, please see the following webpageouter.
*2
Students admitted in 2018 or earlier do so under Academic Groups, but those entering in 2019 and onward instead will enroll in a School.

Yuta Sekiguchi

CNF-Reinforced Composite Materials and Research to Elucidate Reinforcement Mechanisms

Yuta Sekiguchi

2nd-year master's student, AY 2017
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Materials and Chemical Technology,

Cellulose-nanofiber (CNF) reinforced composite materials have garnered a lot of interest in recent years, and are expected to be effective in solving environmental issues. Through structural analysis and physical properties evaluation, I look at reinforcement mechanisms of fibers created with high-speed melt spinning of resin containing CNF. Detailed theoretical analysis, which was previously difficult to do, has become possible for composite materials with the creation of their fibers. I find it interesting that we now have the ability to elucidate these reinforcement mechanisms.

Atsuko Tabuchi

Making a Difference in People's Lives with Innovative Monozukuri

Atsuko Tabuchi

3rd-year bachelor's student, AY 2018
Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, School of Materials and Chemical Technology

My major offers a lot of courses in polymers. Learning about polymer reaction processes has enabled me to gain insight into the properties and regularity of polymers and to deepen my understanding of polymeric materials that are found in everyday life. When I first started university, I only had a vague idea of what chemistry is, but that has since changed through taking the wide range of courses that are available. I have now found a field in which I am interested. After furthering my studies in foundational fields, I intend to go on to do cutting-edge research.

Junpei Kuribayashi

Research Gets Interesting when Microstructures of Polymers can be Elucidated

Junpei Kuribayashi

1st-year master's student, AY 2017
Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, School of Materials and Chemical Technology,

My research involves ABA triblock copolymers containing liquid-crystalline polymers, and their micro phase-separation structures. Copolymers form microstructures that were previously unknown due to the competition between properties of the liquid crystal that prefer to order themselves in alignment and properties of the polymers that prefer a random state. I find it extremely interesting to clarify how their microstructures, which are too small to be seen, are formed based on their polymer characteristics, X-ray measurements, and other analyses.

Number of Students and Faculty Members

Students - 1,989

Faculty - 183

* Student numbers denote maximum student capacity of the department.

* Number of faculty is subject to change.

Click below for the list of School of Materials and Chemical Technology faculty.

List of Faculty

Teaching Certificates That Can Be Acquired

<Undergraduate Degree Program>

First-Class Teaching Certificate for Lower Secondary School(Science)

First-Class Teaching Certificate for Upper Secondary School(Science, industry)

<Master's Degree Program>

Advanced Class Teaching Certificate for Lower Secondary School(Science)

Advanced Class Teaching Certificate for Upper Secondary School(Science, industry)

Disclosure of Information

Laboratory Introduction Videos

Publications

Message from the Dean

Hidetoshi SEKIGUCHI

The School of Materials Science and Engineering, as its name suggests, focuses on "materials" in its research and education. The difference in the way we approach materials is a distinctive feature of our two departments. In the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, we make sure the materials we create have optimized required properties. In the Department of Chemical Science and Engineering, materials are created through chemical reactions and processes that take advantage of the characteristics of raw materials. Both fields cover aspects such as micro to macro scales, and atoms and electrons to devices and plants. Recently, many research projects integrating information science are also being conducted. Through the cutting-edge research at our school, we are fostering researchers and engineers who can lead in the development of materials in the future. We live surrounded by materials and therefore must live in harmony with them. As they vary widely — some beneficial, some harmless, and some harmful —, we must have a firm grasp of their characteristics when creating materials and handle them with a solid sense of ethics. Based on this attitude, we are "Creating Future Society with the Power of Materials and Chemistry" — this is the concept of the School of Materials Science and Engineering. Hidetoshi SEKIGUCHI

  • Toshiyuki FUJII, Associate Dean for Education
  • Ichiro YAMANAKA, Associate Dean for Research, Personnel and Evaluation
  • Takashi ISHIZONE, Associate Dean for Facilities and Safety
  • Yoshitaka KITAMOTO, Associate Dean for Planning, Public Relations and International Affairs
  • Teruaki HAYAKAWA, Associate Dean for Finance and School Strategy