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Tokyo Tech Bulletin No. 63 is launched

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Published: October 26, 2021

Tokyo Tech Bulletin is an email newsletter introducing Tokyo Tech's research, education, and students' activities. The latest edition, "Tokyo Tech Bulletin No. 63", has been published.

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SPECIAL TOPICS

New Student Ambassadors share latest Tokyo Tech vibes through blogs

New Student Ambassadors share latest Tokyo Tech vibes through blogs

Fifteen Tokyo Tech students from 11 countries and regions were appointed as the latest Student Ambassadors in academic year 2021. They share their thoughts on research at Tokyo Tech, the challenges of learning Japanese, the support system around them, and various other topics on their Blog.

Masao Takeyama - At the atomic level - Innovating metallic materials to withstand high temperatures and pressures

Masao Takeyama - At the atomic level - Innovating metallic materials to withstand high temperatures and pressures

Masao Takeyama - At the atomic level - Innovating metallic materials to withstand high temperatures and pressures FACES: Tokyo Tech Researchers, Issue 41: Uncovering iron's untapped potential as a high-temp material for power plants and jet engines.

Insights into US-Japan innovation

Insights into US-Japan innovation

In the heart of Tokyo, and just a short train ride away from Shibuya Crossing, is Tokyo Institute of Technology, one of Japan's top universities for science and engineering. Tokyo Tech is now looking beyond the country's borders, recently opening a hub in Berkeley, California. Called Tokyo Tech ANNEX Berkeley, its purpose is to promote research collaboration with academic and industry institutions in the United States.

Fostering a mindset for creating new value

Fostering a mindset for creating new value

Fostering a mindset for creating new value - Tokyo Tech Entrepreneurship Development Programs: Helping students learn to take decisive action, cooperate with others, and create new value — key skills for any organization.

Research

Breaking Ammonia: A New Catalyst to Generate Hydrogen from Ammonia at Low Temperatures

Breaking Ammonia: A New Catalyst to Generate Hydrogen from Ammonia at Low Temperatures

Ammonia, a carbon-free resource can be split into nitrogen and hydrogen gas with the help of metal catalysts like Nickel (Ni). However, these reactions often require very high operating temperatures. Now scientists from Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have developed a highly efficient calcium imide (CaNH)-supported Ni catalyst that can decompose ammonia at temperatures 100°C lower than what conventional Ni catalysts require. This promising new catalyst can get us closer to sustainably producing hydrogen fuel.

Primitive phase separation processes can be applied to engineering and applied science

Primitive phase separation processes can be applied to engineering and applied science

Phase separation, which is one process that produces protocells (i.e., primitive compartments), is not just important on early Earth but can also be applied to various applied sciences in the modern day, ranging from biotechnology to synthetic biology to engineering. Scientists from ELSI, Tokyo Tech lay out various modern systems relevant to engineering and applied sciences that utilise phase separation phenomena that may have been relevant to the origin of life as well.

Study Explores Remarkable Negative Thermal Expansion Seen in Layered Ruthenates

Study Explores Remarkable Negative Thermal Expansion Seen in Layered Ruthenates

A formerly unnoticed monoclinic distortion in Ca2RuO4 explains its enormous negative thermal expansion (NTE) over a wide range of temperatures, discover researchers from Tokyo Tech. The work promises a different route for the design of unconventional NTE materials, with applications in engines, thermal barrier ceramics, and precision instruments, among other things.

Novel Beamforming Network Solution for Single Layer Printed Circuit Board Implementation

Novel Beamforming Network Solution for Single Layer Printed Circuit Board Implementation

Current beamforming networks (BFNs) based on which next-generation wireless systems are designed require multiple circuit layers for implementation, which increases costs. Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and the European Space Agency have now introduced a novel matrix topology for a BFN that reduces the number of layers BFNs typically need. This paves the way for cheaper and more efficient next-generation wireless systems.

New insights into early Earth's minerals and today's low-cost catalysts

New insights into early Earth's minerals and today's low-cost catalysts

Iron sulfide minerals may have supported multiple redox conversions necessary for the origin of life. To fully discover the catalytic potential of iron sulfide minerals, a greater understanding of the electrochemical properties (the electron flow to and from iron and sulfur) and the interconversion of different structural forms of iron sulfide is necessary. A research team lead by ELSI, Tokyo Tech PI Shawn McGlynn discovered a unique iron sulfide phase occurring transiently during iron sulfide maturation. This finding helps to understand how minerals form, how electrons may have flowed during early catalysis and gives us new insight into using these materials as low-cost catalysts in industrial processes.

In the spotlight

Contact

Public Relations Division

E-mail : publication@jim.titech.ac.jp

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